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Sardine activity 2020 increases on the KZN South Coast

Sardine activity 2020 by OJ
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And it’s a big thank you to OJ Communications and UGU Tourism for penning up yet another super-informative and well-illustrated Sardine Activity 2020 report – Editor
15 June 2020

Sardine activity 2020 increases on the KZN South Coast as winter chill sets in

Ugu South Coast Tourism (USCT) is excited to report more sardine action on the KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) South Coast today (Monday, 15 June), following the weekend’s cold spell. The Sardine Run is an annual attraction whereby sardine shoals move northwards along the coastline, attracting marine life and seine netters. The KZN South Coast benefits from the Sardine Run action being close to the shore, and this year the little fish have already brought a lot of ocean action.

“We’ve had great weather today with spectacular visibility in all directions,” said Noel McDonogh, pilot at World of Wings Flight School, who has been busy taking magnificent aerial shots of the Sardine Run activity. “We’ve spotted sardine shoals off Scottburgh’s Back Beach with many sharks trailing the fish, and whales breaching between Clansthal and Aliwal Shoal. There have been bull sharks, more than 3 metres in length, spotted among the fish; and a southern right whale seen just one kilometre off the Scottburgh beachfront.”

With recreational fishing and seine netting now allowed under Level 3 – with relevant permits – seine netters have been very busy catching sardines. Today, netting took place at Pennington and Scottburgh with large numbers of gannets, sharks, whales dolphins pursuing the bait balls. The sardine run, and associated ‘sardine fever’, is usually a big drawcard for tourism on the KZN South Coast, and USCT is pleased to be able to welcome recreational anglers back to its shores at this time.

Keep up-to-date with all the Sardine Run videos and details by following ‘South Coast Tourism’ on Facebook and @infosouthcoast on Twitter. For more information about the KZN South Coast and USCT, visit www.visitkznsouthcoast.co.za or download the free ‘Explore KZN South Coast’ app to find a local supplier.

High resolution images are available upon request.

IMAGE CREDIT: Noel McDonogh / Wow Flight School

CAPTION: Ugu South Coast Tourism (USCT) is excited about the return of sardine fever to the South Coast. Shoals of sardines were sighted off the KZN South Coast today with netting taking place at Pennington and Scottburgh. Dolphins, sharks and gannets were seen pursuing the bait balls. The sardine run is usually a big tourism drawcard for the South Coast and they are pleased to welcome recreational anglers back to their shores. World of Wings microlight pilot Noel McDonagh shared these images of a birds’ eye view of the action.

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/ENDS

About Ugu South Coast Tourism

Ugu South Coast Tourism (USCT) is the official destination management organisation of the Ugu District Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN), South Africa. The Ugu District comprises four local municipalities that include Umdoni, Umzumbe, Umuziwabantu and Ray Nkonyeni. USCT’s mandate is to grow tourism within the KZN South Coast. This involves implementing marketing and development initiatives that are aimed at showcasing the diverse offerings and experiences of the South Coast as tourist destination. A board of directors oversees USCT, headed by CEO, Phelisa Mangcu.

About KZN South Coast

Known as the ‘Paradise of the Zulu Kingdom’, the KZN South Coast stretches 120 kilometres from Scottburgh to Port Edward and inland to Harding. Here, the spirit of adventure can be discovered among the many cultural experiences, as well as the 35 nature trails and 58 beaches, ideal for activities like river rafting, abseiling, suspension bridges, paintball, surfing, SUP, canoeing, beach horse rides, shark cage diving and free diving. Nicknamed ‘The Golf Coast’, there are 11 golf courses on the KZN South Coast ranging in difficulty, with endless hiking, mountain biking and 4×4 trails for more rugged excursions. Promoting sustainability, the KZN South Coast has a growing agri-tourism sector that offers world-class produce and hosts tours and excursions. The region boasts a number of permanently managed Blue Flag beaches, and is home to some of the world’s top diving sites, Aliwal Shoal and Protea Banks. The originality continues with the annual Sardine Run, coined the #GreatestShoalonEarth, which is the largest biomass migration on earth and a marvel to witness. The region’s many nature reserves are inhabited by indigenous bird and wildlife, and it holds the title for ‘smallest desert on earth’, The Red Desert in Port Edward. The KZN South Coast is a fast-emerging MICE destination which also plays host to a number of high-profile events including the The Bike Fest, Uvukile Gospel Festival, Ugu Jazz, Ugu Film Festival and the South Coast Fever MTB & Trail Run Series.

Issued on behalf of:

Ugu South Coast Tourism (USCT)

Disseminated by:
Olivia Jones Communications

For more information please contact:
Olivia Jones Communications
Cell: 083 653 1720
Email: media@oliviajones.co.za

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By The Sardine News

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Croc Couta by Marco van Wyk opens the season

Croc couta by Marco van Wyk Nov 2017

Croc Couta by Marco van Wyk opens the season

This Croc Couta by Marco van Wyk opens the season for our favourite summer gamefish – the couta! This a real nice and early fish and bodes well for another bumper couta season. The smaller fish usually swim by this early, the bigger couta show up in April or so. And hang around right into August, before disppearing for a few months again.

The diving conditions this week have been below average with cold water and fish being sporadic. Some good fish did come out though. Saturday the east blows from early morning and the swell runs at two meters plus. Sunday we have more East with the swell dropping off later in the day. So it looks like it’s a family weekend. Well done to Bryce Buis on getting fish of the week a 37kg GT and Marco Van Wyk getting club merit fish a decent Croc couta! As always dive safe and straight spears.

Jason Heyne

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26 Billfish on Day One of 40th OET tournament!

40th OET Tournament

26 Billfish on Day One of 40th OET tournament!

Len Mathews is on on the scene at the 40th OET Bill and Gamefish Tournament, and reports 26 billfish released on the first day!

The Mpumalanga Deep Sea Angling Association is hosting the 40th Mercury OET Bill & Gamefish Tournament – at Sodwana Bay from 6 to 10 November 2017.

Once again this prestigious tournament is proudly sponsored by Mercury Outboards.  This tournament has grown from strength to strength since its inception in the late seventies.  The field is always limited with slots coveted by any billfish enthusiast.

Stay tuned for more updates as they come in.

Thank you Len!

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The great KZN nurdle disaster

The nurdles came from off of this ship

The great KZN nurdle disaster

Cameron Johnstone the admin of Salt Fishing South Africa group on Facebook has compiled an excellent report on the great KZN nurdle disaster, which occurred recently.

MSC Shipping are squarely in the spotlight as they allowed this ecological tragedy to unfold unchecked. The nurdles, which are little plastic beads heading for industry, spilled out into the Durban harbour entrance, as the MSC ship ran aground in inclement weather. The ship was saved but when it drove into the harbour, it crashed into another ship, and the containers carrying the nurdles ruptured as they tumbled off the MSC ship and into the water. Literally nothing was done by MSC or port authorities or anyone, to curb the spill.

This has happened before elsewhere in the world, costing millions in clean-up operations. Here in Durban, the powers that be, and the perpetrators, simply do nothing. For days after the incident, the nurdles were allowed to spill out unchecked. As many as three containers full hit the water. Allegedly only one was recovered, and no-one is forthcoming with information at all.

Cameron’s report is detailed and accurate. In a spate of admirable investigative journalism, Cameron and friends uncovered the series of still photos, illustrating the incident in full colour. He deserves any support or assistance he can get. Right now the nurdles have spread up and down the KZN coast, into the Transkei, and even further way down deep into Cape waters.

Cameron and his efforts have resulted a cleanup operation to remove as many nurdles as possible, from the environment right now. This is where you can help. At this relatively early stage, we can hopefully make a difference in the overall percentage of nurdles spilled out into the ocean. They do float so – head on down to your local beach and start collecting! Keep them. Follow Cameron’s group for further instructions.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/381842378579887/

The harm that nurdles can do, aside from the obvious as in fish eating them, can be found in detail, in Cameron’s report at the link below:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/381842378579887/permalink/1393896187374496/

Report by The Sardine News

 

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Catching Garrick on fly with JP Bartholomew

Catching Garrick on fly with JP Bartholomew

I’ve often  wondered why I have this obsession for catching Garrick on fly, maybe it’s those heart stopping chases and the fight as they they try to smash your fly on the surface which play a major role in driving up my adrenaline levels.
Throughout the year I spent My time chasing Kingfish,Snoek and other Game fish, but come May when the first Garrick start arriving  with the Shad- and hopefully the annual Sardine Run – we all get excited.
Garrick are found right around our South African coastline, in summer they prefer the cooler Cape water’s ,but in winter the arrive on our doorstep in KwaZulu-Natal ,and stay here until they spawn in spring before undertaking the long haul back to the Eastern Cape in summer.
They prefer sea temperature’s between 17’C and 23’C and they are able  to tolerate water’s with low salinity levels like Estuaries where they spawn.

Continue reading Catching Garrick on fly with JP Bartholomew

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Fishing IGFA with Mydo by Captain Len Mathews

Fishing Igfa with Mydo worked for Jannie Griesel here at Sodwana Bay last weekend. #3 sized Mydo Baitswimmer

Fishing IGFA with Mydo

Jannie Griesel with his Mydo caught couta at Sodwana this last weekend.
Jannie Griesel with his Mydo caught couta at Sodwana this last weekend.

Every Mydo lure made is totally IGFA compliant. But the baitswimmer couta trace, when rigged with trebles, is not.

Why do we rig with trebles? Popular demand. The treble hooks available nowadays are incredibly strong and sharp, compared to the old 2X’s that we used to get. And the fish are more scarce, making a hook up meaning so much more than it used to.

Mydo anglers were never even introduced to IGFA, back when it all rolled into South Africa, in the 80’s. The main competitions never used IGFA rules either. It took a long time before IGFA rules were applied to money comps. Trebles were the standard issue for catching couta, and still are, with most anglers.

But the rules have changed slowly and now many competitions on the circuit are IGFA now. This is great, as trebles are not really suited to releasing fish at all. Singles inflict far less damage. Captain Duarte Rato fishes single hooks wherever he can. But he still uses trebles for couta traces!

Captain Len Mathews only fishes IGFA rules. This is how he rigs the Mydo Baitswimmer.
Captain Len Mathews only fishes IGFA rules. This is how he rigs the Mydo Baitswimmer.

Captain Len Mathews has been part of the Mydo team for a long time now. He catches great fish. And he only fishes IGFA. Two Kendall Rounds, rigged nice and light. This is the reason Len reckons, that he doesn’t lose fish. Len admits to a slightly more complicated hook up, but that when done right, snags his fish as many times as trebles would. But his use of singles means much more solid hookups.

Meaning he can pull much harder.

Which is great for the sailfish and marlin, who scrounge Lens’ well-presented couta baits often. And for pulling fish away from the taxman.

According to Len – there are a bunch of good reasons to stay single!

Thank you Len!

Learn more about the Mydo Baitswimmer range of lures right here…

https://thesardine.co.za/mydo/

Len Mathews about to release a striped marlin at Zavora, Southern Mozambique
Captain Len Mathews about to release another billfish at Zavora, Southern Mozambique. Len only fishes IGFA using single hooks on his Mydos. A factor which helps in easy and quick releases for the many fish he catches.

 

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Daga Salmon reported by Spearos

Daga Salmon reported by Spearos

Jason Heyne checks in with his weekly spearing report – this week featuring some eagerly awaited for daga salmon. They are also here for sardines, and the big ones are often caught from the shore, right in the shallows! Just please be considerate with this fragile population. The big ones are our breeding stock, and we need them alive! Take your one for the season by all means – they are a very difficult fish to catch or shoot. But leave the rest for next year! TX Jason

“The diving conditions this week have been above average. Daga salmon have made an appearance in the shallows down south, big garrick up north and decent wahoo out deep. Saturday and Sunday a light offshore wind blows in the morning switching to a light on shore in the afternoon. Swell starts at 1.5m on Saturday dropping down to 1m on Sunday. Both days are looking top for a dive. Well done John on getting fish of the week a 24.5kg daga salmon on a shore dive. Good luck to all competing in the second day of natal champs tomorrow. Viz was reported north and south today. As always dive safe and straight spears.” – Jason

For more fishing and sardine news, click here…

https://thesardine.co.za/?s=sardines+2017

To get right in with the sardine action, follow this link…

http://offshoreafrica.com

For great fishing family accommodation on the KZN South Coast (Port Shepstone)…

http://umzimkulu.co.za

And to catch those shad…

https://thesardine.co.za/mydo/

 

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Cape Yellowtail have made their appearance in KZN

Cape Yellowtail have made their appearance in KZN

Cape Yellowtail have made their appearance in KZN

Jason Heyne reports the timeous arrival of the Cape Yellowtail, as they take their place in the lineup for free sardines…

The diving conditions this week have a good average. Cape Yellow tail have made an appearance along with daga salmon. Snoek and garrick are around in shoals. Saturday a moderate south West blows from early morning with the swell running at 1.4m. Sunday morning a light north wind blows switching to a moderate north east later in the day. I would say both mornings early are good for a dive. Well done David Aldworth on getting the fish of the week a 19kg wahoo! Good luck to all competing in the Natal champs tomorrow. As always dive safe and straight spears

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King Mackeral dominating underwater – KZN Spearfishing

King Mackeral dominating underwater - KZN Spearfishing

King Mackeral dominating underwater – KZN Spearfishing

” Jason Heyne reporting that king mackeral are still around and dominating everyones lives…” Xona

The diving conditions this week have been epic. Garrick have arrived, snoek are around in numbers and shoal cuda are thick. Saturday the wind blows offshore in the morning switching to a light to moderate north east in the afternoon with the swell picking up from 1m in the morning to 1.5m in the afternoon. Sunday morning the wind blows offshore switching to a moderate south West in the afternoon and the swell runs at 1.3m throughout the day. Viz was reported north and south coast today. So Saturday and Sunday morning look great for a dive. Well done to Duran Richardson for getting fish of the week a cuda of 19kg on a shore dive!  As always dive safe and straight spears.

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Spearo Report KZN South Africa

Spearo Report KZN South Africa

Our Spearo Report KZN South Africa as compiled by Jason Heyne…

The diving conditions this week have been average to above average. There are cobia, cuda and snoek around in numbers. Saturday and Sunday a light to moderate northeast blows picking up speed in the late afternoon with a swell of 1.5m running both days. So both Saturday and Sunday are looking good for a dive as long as you get on it early. There was viz reported Durban bluff areas and South coast. Well done Garret Staats on getting the fish of the week…a 24kg cobia!! As always dive safe and straight spears.

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Umhlanga Spearfishing Club 7th Annual Crayfish Compo 25 March 2017

Umhlanga Spearfishing Club 7th Annual Crayfish Compo 25 March 2017

Mark it in your diaries, it’s coming right up…the Umhlanga Spearfishing Club 7th Annual Crayfish Compo 25 March 2017.

The fun compo is always great for a few good laughs and fun times seeing old friends at the weigh-in and prize-giving.

With a crayfish braai to beat the band too!

Sardine correspondent Jason Heyne will be there to report…live from the event…

Over to you Jason 😉

 

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Last weeks KZN dive report today!

KZN dive report

Last weeks KZN dive report today!

And so we have last weeks KZN dive report today…Jason is always on time but somehow sometimes the article slips back a few days. It’s still relevant, but should have been included in Friday’s The Sardine News. Thank you Jason Heyne, once again.

The diving conditions this week have been below average. The sea is still clouded with muddy river water but certain areas are cleaning up one day and clouding the next so a bit of effort plus luck is required to find diveable water. Saturday morning a light offshore blows switching to a light southwest later in the day with negligible swell. Sunday a light offshore blows in the morning switching to a moderate southwest later in the day with the swell picking up from 1m to 1.5m late afternoon. Viz was reported both south and north today. Saturday looks best for a dive. Snoek and cuda have been caught this week both north and south. As always dive safe and straight spears.

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Very sad Blue Marlin mystery solved

Blue Marlin Mystery

Very sad Blue Marlin mystery solved

A huge Blue Marlin was reported last week, but enthusiasm levels about it, were not that high.

Then we found out the truth.

The fish was killed, and left out there to be eaten by sharks. KZN North Coast…

It would have weighed 1245 pounds or so, according to its measurements, but I will let Captain Duarte Rato tell the story rather…

“But, the fish that has really made headlines this past week was an estimated Grander Blue released by Bully de Ricqueberg aboard the 21ft Eye-Tie with Roberto Fierro at the wheel. There as only been two Grander Blue Marlin caught in South Africa (and no Black), both of which were weighted. Due to some very odd laws this fish that arrived at the boat dead, could not be boated and had to be discarded.  A real shame has it measured an impressive 148´´(376 cm) by 82´´ (208 cm) with a 24´´(61 cm) tail. This measurements put the fish at 1,245 lbs. If correct it would have beaten the SA record by a long haul.

Speaking to some mates of mine in SA to understand why they could not boat the dead fish it seems that being part of the Isimangaliso one can only take out a billfish if fishing the area outside a tournament (as long as follow some national regulations). However, if fishing a tournament, as it was the case, all billfish have to be released without exception, failing of which could lead to heavy fines and banning of individuals and organizers”

So there it is…

A very, very sad Blue Marlin tail (tale).

 

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A shiver of sharks, a bale of turtles, and a backpacker palace

The fantastic view of the Tugela River Mouth - Sharks and turtles everywhere

A shiver of sharks, a bale of turtles, and a backpacker palace

Add to that an electric storm, a chocolate brown peeling left hander, a community from the 70’s, add a dollop of The Kei and a helping of Mozambique – and that was Tugela Mouth.

The mid summer rains and a huge catchment area made sure the Tugela was pumping out as it should be, spewing a plume of brown water out for miles. The east wind had been sand blasting for two days, the swell was decidedly from the north east and a chocolada left peeled for miles. Unsurfable.

Fins broke the surface continually as we checked in to the best view on the entire North Coast. Called Sensayuma, it qualifies for our coveted “backpacker palace” award. The place was so well kept and run you couldn’t find a bad smell anywhere. It’s huge. Open plan. Dorms are spotless with sea views to wake to. There are two swimming pools?! Jacuzzi. Bar. Rockstar living!

Details to follow…

But if marine wild life is your thing, Tugela Mouth goes to the top of the list. We may have spotted a hundred turtles and the same in sharks. Some turtles even climbed out of the water and were catching the last of the heatwave, when the storm came through.

Visit this place!

Leave surfboard behind.

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Fly fishing Umdloti with JP Bartholomew

Fly fishing Umdloti with JP Bartholomew

And here we have JP Bartholomew entertaining us again with tales of fly fishing Umdloti, just north of where JP lives…

A final break in the weather and I wanted to get some flyfishing in and especially to see how my right arm was doing after battling with Tennis Elbow which I had been battling with for the last couple of month’s.I hit the Umdloti stretch with my 8/9wt Explorer fitted with a Explorer Orion 9wt Reel with intermediate line using a 22lb fluorocarbon leader.The water was flat with a slight South westerly wind blowing and as always fishing on a pushing in tide.The water was a nice green/blue in colour which was perfect not clean and not dirty the stretch was mine with the odd Holidaymaker Anglers trying there luck. A lot of scattered reef along the shorebreak and open gullies made it that more interesting to fly fish. Don’t you just ever get that feeling that today is just going to be an exciting morning for you not expecting anything big but just hopping for a epic morning’s session and you just wanna get going?  Well this time I had a awesome morning’s fly fishing.

I had set up my fly set up and looked for a fly best suited to try the water’s I was going to be fishing that would attract any rock or sand dwellers in the near vicinity of where I would target the are I would cast towards.I decided to go with a Black Clouser which would stand out and throw more of a dark silhouette and attract some nice Specimen to it.I started peeling off line to begin my assault, I managed to get close to some structure and felt some nice bums on my retrieve but no hook ups so I a slower retrieve and not long a went on tight  getting a few little head shakes I was just not quite sure what it was definitely not a small kingie of sorts, finally got it to surface and I had a little beauty of a Kob I quickly got a pic for my photo gallery and removed the fly and slowly released it back into the water stokked I was on the scoreboard I continued to cast around the same structure as well as bouncing my fly off a small sand bank to my left and slowly allowing it to sink and then slowly bouncing it off the bottom to get a reaction I tried the same retrieve a few times before I went on again.
My rod went tight and this fella was giving me stick which felt so good hoping to see what I had picked up a few more runs I slowly started retrieving the line back and slowly got it to the surface it was a nice size Stone Bream. I quickly got  my buddy to take a pic for the gallery and removed the fly and slowly released it back to fight another day epic seeing how much activity happens when you fish a pushing in tide and the conditions are right and the fish species  are roaming around looking for anything which gets knocked off the rocks or when the waves churned up the sand throwing up all sorts of crustaceans and small sprats allowing anything in tvicinityity to feed freely on them.
After a few more casts I finally moved on  to a different spot as the water was pushing a little more with more white water breaking over the rocks hoping to try target for a kingfish or two hopefully.I had a couple of casts into the white water  before going tight a a nice quick peel on my line zig zaggingfrom left to right very unasual fight after a few minutes I managed to get close to it so I could identify the fish I had hooked into – Eisssh my first a Concertina fish nice size too happy with my catch I just had to get the pic in quickly and release it back as soon as possible which I did.I  carried on for a while hoping for a bigger pick up as the gulley filled up nicely and the waves were still brakeing over the rocks it was still fish able for a few more casts.I slowly started moving out slightly more backwards so I could have a few more casts in front of me towards the bay that had build up in front while I was busy fishing but to no avail.
Fly fishing Umdloti with JP Bartholomew
Fly fishing Umdloti with JP Bartholomew and his Concertina Fish
I moved out and walked more down towards the bigger bays and try for some small Geeeeeet’s hopefully I kept to the Black Clouser why change your fly when you’ve been having such good results with it. I slowly started peeling off line to begin my casting I spotted a nice little gully which came off from a sand bank and dropped off into a nice deepish pool of running white water which is always a exciting spot to target kingfish ambushing sprats or smaller Mullet in the turbulenced water.It wasn’t long before I got smoked by something that just felt like another Concertina fish and yip it was another I safely removed the fly and released it back, carring on and casting into the channel I got a chase and it it my fly but missed the hook up I could only have been a small kingie so I kept at casting in the direction of the chase I got hoping it would give Me another go.No luck after a few more casts nothing was happening so I moved further down where to more of a sandy bay with a scattered reef to see what species I could hook my fly into and attract what ever is lurking along the sandy channels.
Well this would be my final session before my turn around and start to make my way back to my car. Looking to see where would be the best option to start I saw a sandy spot just starting to get water washing over the bank that could only be to My advantage with the water stirring up the sand and exposing small Crustaceans,  Sealice , Sand Shrimp….etc and all I had to do is cast my fly towards the turmoil and white water rolling around.
I gave myself 20min to cast and hopefully catch my last fish before before heading home for some family time….!! Well I started casting onto the bank and dropping my fly down and using a slow retrieve hoping something would see it amongst the sand and white water trying to get away and smash my fly. I just kept at it eventually I felt a bump then another bump and a miss then got a proper pick up and quickly held my line and lifted up my rod to strike I was on Dad finally I got my Species that was playing catch me if you can but with perseverance I hooked the cheeky bugger not knowing what it was it was a feisty fella gave Me a nice little rev retrieving  some line back I could see what looked to me like a little Grunter which landed up being My first Grunter on fly completely stokked at my little Spotted Grunter I took the Pic and released it back and got back to casting hoping for a bigger Boykie if there was one there must be more surely.
I changed my fly to a Brown Brush Fly to try impersonat a Brown Shrimp I casted for may be 15min then totally got Smashed I really thought I had the Daddy  Grunter but landed up being a nice size Stone Bream unfortunately I had to take the Pic of My Boykie Stone lying on the sand quickly removed the fly and released it back safely I got straight back into the channel and kept at it hoping just hoping for that Big Cock Grunter.Boom I was on again and what ever hit me it was peeling line and going for it , it was stripping Me nicely best fight I had all morning.I finally started getting my line back I thought I had a little kingie on but I had hooked a nice size Wave Garrick epic I placed the fella on the sand took the Pic and released it back into the water and watched it swim of into the blue.
Well I called it a morning a gr8 one at that and started heading back to my car and just enjoyed the playback’s in My head on the morning I just had , well maybe I’ll get My kingie the next time round…Homeward bound.
Tight line’s
Happy New Year My Friends have a epic weekend all the BEST FOR 2017…..GOD BLESS….!!!
Cheers JP.
Once again JP, many thanks for sharing your fishing experiences with us. It’s really motivating, educational and appreciated! – Sean
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KZN Spearfishing Report

KZN Spearfishing report filled with hardcore spearfishing imagery and compiled by Jason Heyne

KZN Spearfishing Report

KZN Spearfishing Report by Jason Heyne.

This informative and entertaining spearfishing report is really high on the WOW factor. Each week Jason and co-spearos compile a montage of really amazing spearfishing action photos. Thank you Jason!

“The diving conditions this week have been average with strong current and low viz in most areas. The conditions did improve dramatically today (Friday) with a moderate southwest blowing all day. Saturday morning a light northeast blows picking up speed during the day with the swell running at 1.2m. Sunday the northeast gets on it early morning picking up steadily during the day with the swell starting small and increasing in size through the day. So it looks like Saturday morning is the best bet for a dive. The snoek are on the north coast and rumour has it that one or two king mackerel have come out already. Brusher and grunter are thick in the shallows. As always dive safe and straight spears”

Jason Heyne

 

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Expert addresses challenges facing wildlife at monthly Crocworld Conservation Centre talk

Expert addresses challenges facing wildlife at monthly Crocworld Conservation Centre talk

Increasing human encroachment into natural areas and the accompanying environmental impact is threatening the lives of our ever-diminishing wildlife population. Director of the Centre for Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW), Paul Hoyte, will be talking about ‘The Challenges Facing Our Wildlife’ as part of Crocworld Conservation Centre’s monthly lecture series, taking place at 9am on Saturday, 8 October.

Having joined the CROW team as Marketing and Communications’ Officer in 2013, Hoyte immediately took to his role of raising the public image and profile of the organisation and its work in local wildlife rehabilitation.

His dedication to the Yellowwood Park-based centre was evident and – with the 36-year-old organisation’s strong belief in succession from within – Hoyte was appointed as Director of CROW in July this year, taking over from valuable predecessor, Claire Hodgkinson.

“As Director, my role involves fundraising, marketing, strategic partnership development and, of course, heading up the organisation’s dedicated team of staff and volunteers,” explained Hoyte. “I have experience in operations’ management from my previous work experience and am currently completing a degree in Communication Science through Unisa.”

CROW was established as one of South Africa’s first wildlife rehabilitation centres dedicated to the rescue, rehabilitation and release of all indigenous wildlife found in KwaZulu-Natal. It is run by a small, yet experienced team of staff and volunteers who assist more than 3 000 orphaned, injured and displaced animals every year. From mongoose, genets and monkeys to birds, reptiles and antelope, CROW gives these distressed animals a second chance at a free, safe and sustainable life. As with all registered, non-profit organisations, CROW relies solely on the support and goodwill of the public locally and internationally to ensure the doors remain open.

“In my years at CROW I have learned so much about the impact we as a society have on our wildlife every single day, from a simple piece of litter to not recycling or conserving water,” explained Hoyte. “Collectively, people have more influence over their surrounds than they realise, from micro to macro. Through this talk, I want people to see the dangers we create while providing them with practical ways to slightly adjust their daily habits so that they can reside in harmony with all living creatures. It’s our way of life that create the challenges faced by wildlife each day and the main reason thousands of animals get admitted to CROW each year.”

The hour-long talk is sure to provide the audience with some astounding insights into our natural world and what we can do to make a difference. Guests are encouraged to arrive for registration and welcoming at 8.30am, with the talk set to begin at 9 am, after which there will be time for questions before complimentary tea and coffee are served. Tickets will include entry into the park and cost R75 per adult and R35 for pensioners and scholars.

Guests are also invited to stay after the talk to discover the rest of the park. Birders will relish the opportunity to explore the park’s aviaries, which house endemics like the Blue Crane as well as local favourites like the Knysna Turaco. The park is also home to an impressive collection of snakes, crocodiles and alligators, while more than 200 wild bird species have been spotted on its grounds. Refreshments will be available for purchase at sea-view restaurant Le Rendez-Vous, while those with an interest in gardening should pay a visit to onsite Izinyoni Indigenous Nursery.

To ensure availability, tickets for the talk must be reserved in advance. To book your place, contact Nolean Allun, Crocworld Conservation Centre on 039 976 1103 or 083 654 9651 or email crocworld. Account Details: Crocworld (Crookes Brothers Limited) Banking Details: FNB, Branch: Scottburgh, Branch Code: 220227, Account Number: 53640119111. Please fax the proof of payment to 039 978 3279.
For more information about Crocworld Conservation Centre, visit www.crocworld.co.za, @CrocworldCC on Twitter, or Crocworld Conservation Centre on Facebook. To find out more about Izinyoni Indigenous Nursery, which is located on the grounds of the centre and open to the public from Monday to Saturday between 8am and 1pm, visit www.izinyoni-nursery.co.za.

Director of the Centre for Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW), Paul Hoyte
Director of the Centre for Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW), Paul Hoyte
This Black Sparrowhawk was released after being found covered in a bird repellent gel and unable to fly. Fortunately for this little guy, the CROW team were able to clean the sticky substance off his feathers and get him back into the wild.
This Black Sparrowhawk was released after being found covered in a bird repellent gel and unable to fly. Fortunately for this little guy, the CROW team were able to clean the sticky substance off his feathers and get him back into the wild.
CROW River Clean-up.
CROW River Clean-up.
Monkey Covered in oil.
Monkey Covered in oil.
This Blue Duiker was recently released onto a reserve in the North Coast after narrowly escaping the clutches of a poacher.
This Blue Duiker was recently released onto a reserve in the North Coast after narrowly escaping the clutches of a poacher.

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No sardine report 25 July 2016

No sardine report 25 July 2016

Jay Steenkamp patrolling down south to Port Edward and beyond reports that the surfing has been fantastico and they have all been getting shacked. Roosta in Umzumbe reports the same clean powerful swells gracing their underground. But no mention of sardines. Scattered baitballs of other types of smallies up and down, but no sardines.

He also reports that the hard rains that have been falling, have flushed out all the smaller rivers and that the ocean is now a mess. The featured image was shot by Jay at St. Michaels a few minutes ago.

No sardine report 25 July 2016
No surfing, fishing or diving today. No sardine report 25 July 2016

Check out Jason Heyne’s comprehensive weekly spearfishing reports to really learn what is going on under the water off our coastline. He reports in every Friday and we usually have it on thesardine.co.za by Saturday morning, depending on the Friday night :-).

Debbie Smith reports in from out on the edge off Port St. Johns, that their sardine run is still running and that they were encountering baitballs and predators on almost every launch. But the weather has brought the team at Offshore Africa a well deserved chance to regroup and recover from their high adrenalin activities.
More about Offshore Africa, and Diving With Sharks.

And below is Debbie Smith’s Instagram feed portraying the lekker life they are all living right now in and around Port St. Johns as the sardine shoals get them and their guests right into the thick of it.

http://divingwithsharks.co.za/dwsblog/instagram-feed/

Keep checking back on thesardine.co.za and sign up to our mailing list to get a free compilation of the weeks news, right in your mail box. The form is up top of the right on thesardine.co.za website.

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46kg couta at Cape Vidal by Etienne Thiebauts and GoFish

46kg couta at Cape Vidal by Etienne Thiebauts and GoFish

The Full story…

From Facebook…thanks to GoFish.

Click here to get over to their Facebook page

Here is Ettienne Thiebauts incredible story of his quite remarkable catch at Cape Vidal on Friday, 17 June 2016…..

“So on my way back from Vidal this afternoon the WhatsApp messages start pouring in and facebook breaks my data bundle. Here’s my side of the story (a bit long winded, but it is a fisherman’s tale after all?)

Continue reading 46kg couta at Cape Vidal by Etienne Thiebauts and GoFish

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Wahoo! Spearfishing report KZN

Wahoo! Spearfishing report KZN by Jason Heyne

Check out all the wahoo featuring in this weeks spearfishing report by the ever reliable Jason Heyne… – Shonalanga

The sea conditions at the start of the week were great then a big north east pushed through on Wednesday which churned the sea up. Thursday and Friday the south west blew cleaning up the south coast. Saturday the swell drops to 1.5m with a light north blowing switching to a moderate north east later in the day. Sunday looks tops with light variable wind all day and a 1.4m swell running. There are big king mackerel patrolling the south coast with garrick and daga salmon starting to make an appearance. Big Natal snoek are back on the north coast. Sunday looks to be the best day for a dive. As always dive safe and straight spears.