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11 June 2024 Sardine News Report HUGE Sharks

HUGE SHARKS 11 June 2024 Sardine Run Update

11 June 2024 Sardine News Report HUGE Sharks

11 June 2024 Sardine News Report HUGE Sharks: Kevin gonna do today’s report…

Morning, chaps. This is Kevin from Qora Mouth, just north of Mazepa Bay in the southern Transkei. Well, that huge shoal of sards that passed us two and a half weeks ago is the same shoal that’s now on the KZN South Coast. Another wonderful day of netting went on today. We’ve heard reports of a, big net came out and Sezela saw a video of that.

Lots of sardines right in the shorebreak, guys throwing throw nets, cast nets, and just pulling out huge nets from the beach. But we’ve seen also on some videos, some extremely large sharks right on the seashore. They’re in the shore break in water that that actually is way too shallow for them.

And this is where the, the public are going in to, to scoop up sardines. So guys, just keep in mind that there are lots of predators in the water. And they’re not necessarily gonna be attacking you, but they could bite by, by accident and because they’re in a feeding frenzy. So just remember safety, safety first, stay out of the water at all costs.

It’s not worth it to go and run in and try and scoop up sards with your shirt or with a little net. And, um, anything more than ankle deep or knee deep, you’re looking for trouble. So safety first.

I’m giving these sards about two to three days and then they should be coming around the bluff onto the Durban beachfront and the shoals big enough to definitely make that passage possible.

They do start moving a lot slower once they hit the KZN waters and mainly due to predator activity. So yeah, they don’t have far to go, probably 40 to 50 kilometers and, and there’ll be on the Durban beach front. Anyway, that’s all I’ve got for now. Except us here at Sardine News Would like to offer our sincere condolences to Goolam’s family one of the netters who unfortunately had a tragic accident today in their rubber duck and so far probably two casualties So, yes we’re very sorry for that Anyway chaps, keep it real conserve and protect and Let’s look after the marine environment Have a good time with these sards, but be careful.

And as I said, safety first, stay out of the water, lots of toothy critters out there. That’s all I got for now. I’ll keep you updated as things happen. Cheers.

Affiliated YouTube Channels

https://youtube.com/@Brucifire – highly entertaining surf reporting

https://youtube.com/@thesardinenews – neva miss a single sardine

https://youtube.com/@mydotackletalk – highly technical sport fishing

https://youtube.com/@surflaunchingsouthernafrica – getting out there safely

https://youtube.com/@waterwoes – complain here

Affiliated websites

https://umzimkulu.co.za – self-catering right on the Umzimkulu River
https://umzimkuluadrenalin.co.za – sardine run coming up
https://thesardine.co.za – never miss a single sardine
https://masterwatermen.co.za – news from deep down
https://brucifire.co.za – surf and conditions reporting
https://fishbazaruto.com – your dreams are out there
https://mydofishinglures.co.za – technical sport fishing

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10 June 2024 Where do Sardines even Come From?

10 June 2024 Where do Sardines Come From

10 June 2024 Where do Sardines even Come From?

10 June 2024 Where do Sardines even Come From?: Sometimes in life, you got to make important decisions. And it ain’t no different for sardines!

In this 10 June 2024 Sardine News update, we have an overload of entertaining and informative video. To everyone who sent clips in, especially the dude in the flying machine, a huge THANK you from all of us who follow things here at The Sardine News. Your contributions are giving the public a 3D look at what goes on at the beach during these fun times.

Enjoy the video…

Monday 10 June 2024

Will go down as one of the most beautiful and memorable days in sardine run history. It all just unfolded so fast. The ocean here in KZN recovers quick, but tghis was lightning speed. Clean water hugging the coastline making for the most picturesque sardine scenes ever.

A handful of nets went in. And some were huge! 400 Crates type thing!

Where do sardines come from?

But the main story in this report is Kevin brushing on where these sardines and actually live. And what choices they faced, in order to get all this way from home.

It is fascinating stuff. And is complemented by animations and video as Kevin explains the life cycle of Sardinops Sagax, our beloved sardines.

Please don’t forget to like and Subscribe to our YouTube Channel(s).

Affiliated YouTube Channels

https://youtube.com/@Brucifire – highly entertaining surf reporting

https://youtube.com/@thesardinenews – neva miss a single sardine

https://youtube.com/@mydotackletalk – highly technical sport fishing

https://youtube.com/@surflaunchingsouthernafrica – getting out there safely

https://youtube.com/@waterwoes – complain here

Affiliated websites

https://umzimkulu.co.za – self-catering right on the Umzimkulu River
https://umzimkuluadrenalin.co.za – sardine run coming up
https://thesardine.co.za – never miss a single sardine
https://masterwatermen.co.za – news from deep down
https://brucifire.co.za – surf and conditions reporting
https://fishbazaruto.com – your dreams are out there
https://mydofishinglures.co.za – technical sport fishing

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KZN South Coast Offshore Fishing Tips

KZN South Coast Offshore Fishing Tips

KZN South Coast Offshore Fishing Tips

KZN South Coast Fishing Tips: A big welcome to Zach Norton, a guest writer here at The Sardine News. Zach is the first of a slew of new contributors, who will be featuring regularly on this website.

Thank you Zach!

Photo by Go2dim on Shutterstock

Anglers who visit South Africa’s KwaZulu-Natal region are spoiled for choice as the area is flooded with top-notch fishing spots. Choose a prime location on one of the blue-flag status beaches or charter a boat and scope out Durban Harbour.

For serious anglers visiting the region, offshore fishing is essential, especially during the annual Sardine Run phenomenon.  

Here are our top recommendations for enjoying offshore fishing along the KZN south coast.

Gain Experience

KZN South Coast Offshore Fishing Tips

Photo by Itxu on Shutterstock

If you have never held a fishing rod, it’s not the best idea to aim for that Pulitzer Prize-worthy shot with a blue marlin. Fortunately, the KZN south coast spans roughly 100 miles between Durban and Port Edward and offers many outstanding nearshore fishing locations for recreational anglers.

These include:

  • Amanzimtoti
  • Rocky Bay, Park Rynie
  • Stiebel Rocks, Hibberdene
  • Margate Fishing Pier
  • Palmer’s Rock, Glenmore Beach

The bulk of the catch will comprise shad, kob (colloquial: kabeljou), and garrick (a.k.a. leerfish), an iconic gamefish up to five feet long. Anglers can also reel in smaller panfish such as blacktail, stone bream, and karanteen (strepie) among the rocks.

Occasionally, a lesser sand shark, skate, pompano, or cobia (a.k.a. Prodigal Son) will tighten the line. The latter is a fusiform fish praised by restaurant-goers that can grow up to two meters.

If you want to try reeling in such leviathans but you’re like many of us who abandoned our gym memberships over the past couple years, it might be good to get back on the arm machines and extend your stamina!

Durban Harbour

KZN South Coast Offshore Fishing Tips by Zach Norton for The Sardine News

Photo by Ava Peattie on Shutterstock

You’ll do well to start the offshore fishing experience from Durban Harbour, Africa’s second-largest port. It is home to a huge variety of species including snapper salmon, grunter, sole, rock cod, and perch.

Using small spoons or lures, you may even get hold of a pickhandle barracuda, springer (a.k.a. skipjack), torpedo scad, or the unusually pinstripe-like walla-walla. 

Even rarer are the chrome-finish queenfish and musselcracker (poenskop or beenbek), an explosive fighter that can live 80 meters down.

Deep Sea Fishing Areas

KZN South Coast Offshore Fishing Tips featuring billfishing by Zach Norton

Photo by kelldallfall on Shutterstock

As the meeting point of the Atlantic and Indian Oceans, the KZN coast is teeming with marine life. Also, temperatures are moderately summer-like year-round, making it perfect for deep sea angling. 

The most popular sites for saltwater fishing are:

  • Umkomaas
  • Rocky Bay
  • Shelly Beach
  • Pennington
  • Port Edward

Here you will catch trophies like billfish, dorado, amberjack, Cape salmon (geelbek), and yellowfin tuna. When you have one on the line, it’s a good idea to let it fight for a while instead of pulling it out of the water straight away.

One reason for doing this is to wear the fish out so it’s calmer once in your hands. The other reason is so it can gather other shoal members. By keeping the lures going, the chances of success improve exponentially. Plus, the hustle and bustle will attract bigger fish.

See the Reefs

Protea Reef on the KZN South Coast is full of sharks!
Protea Reef on the KZN South Coast is full of sharks!

Photo by Stefan Pircher on Shutterstock

Most of South Africa’s coral reefs are situated along the north coast toward Mozambique, but the south coast has one too. Protea Banks starts just 5 miles (8 km) out of Port Shepstone and is home to seven species of shark:

  • Hammerheads
  • Sand sharks (a.k.a. raggedtooth sharks, raggies)
  • Giant guitarfish
  • Dusky sharks
  • Bull sharks (Zambezi)
  • Tiger sharks
  • Blacktip sharks

As it’s one of the richest tuna grounds in the world, you will find many other predators such as giant barracudas, potato bass, and sea pike. A-listers such as wahoo, mahi-mahi, billfish, and Malabar groupers have been spotted as well.

Sardine Run

Sardine Run 2022 is about to kick off!
Sardine Run 2022 is about to kick off!

Photo by Andrea Izzotti on Shutterstock

The annual Sardine Run is the icing on the cake for any fishing enthusiast. In the winter months of June and July, shoals stretch for several miles, speeding along the Agulhas Current in search of better grounds.

The subject of many a wildlife show, the Sardine Run attracts dolphins, copper sharks, and Bryde’s and humpback whales for their yearly all-you-can-eat buffet.

Bait

Photo by Jason Richeux on Shutterstock

Most offshore anglers swear by live bait, but artificial lures can work just as well, provided that you’re using the right kind to match the right species. It’s a good idea to research your fish well to emulate its favorite prey.

For example, copias love crabs and other shellfish and amberjacks are especially attracted to pinfish, while shrimp work for fish of all sizes.

Make sure to clean your hands before touching lures, as contaminants like grease, soap, sunscreen, and insect repellent can be massive turnoffs for fish with a sophisticated sense of smell.

Trolling with lures works best for sailfish and marlin, while spooning will entice dorados. Bait strips work particularly well for catching Queen mackerel during winter. Also consider trying the fun new hands-on way of fishing with lighter tackle known as flick sticking.

Tackle

Photo by paul prescott on Shutterstock

It’s a good idea to use a 7-9 foot (2.1-2.7m) rod with an ocean baitcaster reel and braided line, which is far superior to monofilament line.

A line capacity anywhere between 20-50lbs (9-22.6kg) combined with a circle hook between 4/0 and 7/0 is perfect for most people, but for larger species you will definitely want to go higher.

Make sure to stop by one or two local bait-and-tackle stores for on-point advice before you mount the boat ladders.

Study

Photo by wildestanimal on Shutterstock

It’s good practice to keep learning about fish behavior — either from books or observation.

Ask yourself: How deep do they swim? How active are they at different times of the day and in different types of weather? And what is the tidal influence?

For example, it’s best to start around 7am as fish tend to go deeper when the water is cooler. Also, dolphins can be an indication of nearby shoaling yellowfin tuna.

What to Pack

Photo by Evgenius1985 on Shutterstock

Here’s a checklist for basic items you’ll need besides fishing gear:

  • Change of clothing and slip-resistant shoes with closed toes
  • Polarized sunglasses with neck strap
  • A good camera
  • Full-brim hat or cap
  • Sunscreen and lip balm
  • Hand towel and sanitizer
  • Gunny sack to keep fish cool in case you want to keep them
  • Ice chest in your vehicle
  • Seasickness pills and other prescriptions
  • Windbreakers for unexpected downpours and sea spray
  • Cash for fish cleaning or gratuities
  • Dry bags for storing valuables
  • Drinking water and granola bars
  • Gloves for handling barracuda, sea pike, sharks, rock cods, and mackerel
  • Band-aids
  • Measuring tape
  • Pliers and knife
  • Fishing license

Regulations

Photo by David Herraez Calzada on Shutterstock

Before heading out on open waters, check the legislation relevant to your trip. Anglers over the age of 12 need a saltwater fishing license. These can be purchased from any Post Office in South Africa.

In case of commercial or culinary intent, always check the minimum size and catch limit for your fish species. There are more and more ethical anglers who fish purely for sportsmanship and practice catch-and-release with artificial lures instead of live bait.

Some examples of restrictions : the bag limit for garrick is two per person per day. A closed season applies to red steenbras and many other species. Shad are four per person. And so on.

Respecting these rules and following the tips as outlined will guarantee a surefire way toward that epic deep sea fishing trip you have been looking forward to!

About the Author

Ralph Zoontjens is a product designer with a master’s degree in Industrial Design from Eindhoven University of Technology and a love of the outdoors. Currently based out of Tilburg, the Netherlands, he specializes in 3D printing and works as a content writer with topics that revolve around design, technology, and outdoor adventure.

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Crocworld Conservation Centre reintroduces Monthly Lecture Series

The Crocworld Conservation Centre kicks off another series of conservation lectures this year, with the rescuing of baby flamingos

Crocworld reintroduces Monthly Conservation Lecture Series

Crocworld Conservation Centre is delighted to announce the return of its monthly environmental lecture series, which will be hosted at the newly launched Fish Eagle Café.

The first lecture in the series will take place on Saturday, 9th March. It will explore the rescue and rehabilitation of abandoned Lesser Flamingo chicks at Kamfers Dam near Kimberley in the Northern Cape.

According to Birdlife Africa, the Lesser Flamingo is listed as “Near-threatened” on the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s (IUCN) Red List. This is mainly because of a declining population, few breeding sites, and human-induced threats to the breeding sites.

Kamfers Dam is one of only four breeding localities for Lesser Flamingos on the African continent and the only breeding locality in South Africa. It supports the largest permanent population of the species in Southern Africa, with an estimated population of sixty thousand Lesser Flamingos.

However, due to the severe drought, more than five thousand chicks and eggs were abandoned in January this year. The Kimberley SPCA approached various rehabilitation centres around South Africa, including the uShaka Sea World Animal Health Department, to assist in hand-rearing the Lesser Flamingo chicks.

The Crocworld Conservation Centre kicks off another series of conservation lectures this year, with the rescuing of baby flamingos
The Crocworld Conservation Centre kicks off another series of conservation lectures this year, with the rescuing of baby flamingos

 

Since 27th January staff at uShaka Sea World have worked tirelessly to rehabilitate more than 250 chicks. According to Ann Kunz of the South African Association for Marine Biological Research (SAAMBR), staff and volunteers have spent hours feeding chicks special feed through syringes and constantly monitoring the birds, many of which were initially in uShaka Sea World’s hospital.

“Last week, chicks were a delicate creamy white colour with some darker down feathers. Most of them are now sporting a pinkish tinge on their feathers with bright red faces and scarlet mouths. This week was a milestone as many of the chicks in special care have left the ICU and are spending a couple of hours each day in the high care enclosure outside, enjoying the sunshine,” said Kunz.

Join the staff from the uShaka Sea World Animal Health Department who will be sharing their fascinating experiences rearing these flamboyant birds at Crocworld Conservation Centre’s recently launched Fish Eagle Café. The restaurant boasts exquisite views, delicious food and great service, under the management of the vastly experienced Executive Chef and manager Morne van Zyl.

Martin Rodrigues, Crocworld Conservation Centre’s manager said, “We are ecstatic that our monthly lecture series is launching with such an interesting subject. We look forward to our guests enjoying a combination of knowledgeable experts in a picturesque venue.”

Registration for the event is at 08h30 with the lecture beginning at 09h00. Tickets will cost R50.00 and include an Early Bird Breakfast with a cup of percolated coffee, as well as entrance into Crocworld’s indigenous gardens, and bird and reptile centres.

For more information or to make a booking, contact Morne van Zyl at the Fish Eagle Café on083 658 7073 or email mvanzyl@cbl.co.za. Alternatively contact Martin Rodrigues on 078 484 1859 or Crocworld Conservation Centre on 039 976 1103.


Catch us on Facebook at http://facebook.com/thesardine.co.za/ where we also keep up a steady stream of news.

Check out our Trips and Travel menu above.

 

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South Coast Couta run in full swing

South Coast Couta run in full swing

South Coast Couta run in full swing

Ryan Saunders at the Umzimkulu Marina with a fine fish collection.

Topped off by a characteristically outsized South Coast Couta.

April through June are the right months to fish for your own crocodile couta, down in southern KZN.

Get in touch on umzimkulu.co.za if you want to put in an order.

And from just the other day…

https://www.facebook.com/stealthkayak/photos/a.1035808809787586.1073741831.257418350959973/1304525739582557/?type=3&theater

Stealth Performance products performing recently on the south coast of KZN, South Africa
Stealth Performance products performing recently on the south coast of KZN, South Africa